OC Safety Blog

  • Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Categories
    Categories Displays a list of categories from this blog.
  • Tags
    Tags Displays a list of tags that have been used in the blog.
  • Bloggers
    Bloggers Search for your favorite blogger from this site.
  • Team Blogs
    Team Blogs Find your favorite team blogs here.
  • Login
    Login Login form

Posted by on in Safety

Knowing how the body reacts in extreme temperatures essential to keep yourself and others safe when if you ever find yourself in a dangerous situation. When it comes to extremely cold temperatures, one if the immediate dangers that people face is frostbite, which can cause even more damage to the body if not treated properly. Today, the first aid and safety experts here at OC Safety will be breaking down what frostbite is, they symptoms to look out for, and how to treat it effectively and efficiently.

Understanding Frostbite

Frostbite is a condition when the skin and the tissue underneath freezes, and often happens in temperatures that are below freezing. The most common areas of the body that become afflicted by frostbite are any skin that is exposed, such as the nose, cheeks, ears, and chin. Those with poor circulations to certain extremities like their toes and fingers also have a higher risk of getting frostbite in those areas. When the skin and the tissue freezes, the body reacts by constricting blood vessels in the frozen areas in an effort to keep your overall core temperature stable and prevent the onset of hypothermia.  The most common causes of frostbite are exposure the extremely cold weather, or direct skin contact with ice or other materials that are at a temperature below freezing.

What Are The Symptoms Of Frostbite?

While many people may imagine a body part turning black as the obvious sign of frostbite, it is actually only the last and most severe stage of frostbite. In total, there are about 4 different degrees of frostbite, each with different symptoms based on the extent that the tissue has frozen. The degrees and their symptoms are as follows:

1st Degree Frostbite - Often referred to as “frostnip”, the skin begins to turn pale or red in color. The skin is also cold to the touch, giving off very little warmth as the upper layers of the tissue have begun to freeze. Frostnip often gives a sensation of itching, tingling, or feeling slightly numb.

2nd Degree Frostbite - the skin begins to turn a pale yellow color that resembles wax, and some ice crystal may be apparent on the outside layers of skin. The affected area will often become swollen and create a painful burning sensation. 

3rd/4th Degree Frostbite - at later stages, every layer of the skin down to the nerves and blood vessels have been frozen over. The most common symptoms and signs of this stage are complete numbness of the area, lack of ability to move, black coloration, and the tissue is hard to the touch.  It is difficult to know the severity of the damage at this stage, and is often only discernible after some time.

How To Treat Frostbite

There are two main methods of treating frostbite which involve thawing the frozen skin, but before we go over those, we need to talk about timing and preparation for treatment. If you don’t have access to a warmer environment for long while, it is recommended that you don’t attempt to treat the frostbite. This is because if the tissue is thawed and then refrozen, it can actually cause more harm to the body. If this is the case, it is recommended that you simply wrap the affected area and limit movement as much as possible, since the ice crystals under the skin can also cause damage when moving. Now onto the types of frostbite treatment.

Passive Rewarming - This method uses the person’s own body heat, or a heated environment, to thaw the frozen tissues and bring it back to a stable temperature.

Active Rewarming -  Active rewarming entails the application of heat directly onto the affected tissue, such as dipping a frostbitten hand into extremely hot water. This method is commonly used in conjunction with passive rewarming.

Both of these methods carry some risk, since the rapid return of blood flow to the frostbitten area can cause a sharp drop in the body’s core temperature and result in an irregular heartbeat. That is why treatment for frostbite is most often performed in a hospital with the assistance of a medical professional.

Contact OC Safety For More Helpful Information!

If you have any questions about how to deal with frostbite or identify early signs, contact the first aid and safety experts here at OC Safety. We offer first aid certification, HIPAA training, and CPR classes in Orange County, so you can be prepared with the vital skills to help you and your loved ones in times of need. Just contact us for more information on our classes, or book your courses by checking our calendar, which is updated regularly.

Hits: 0
0

Posted by on in Safety

Common Myths and Misconceptions About CPRAs your providers of CPR training, ACLS certification, and BLS certification in Corona, we at OC Safety want to give you the training needed to save a life if someone’s in danger. Through our CPR training courses, you’ll have the capability of helping someone who’s suffered from cardiac arrest. While we’re proud to provide proper training and information, there are unfortunately some myths and misconceptions about CPR lingering around that may have altered the views of people who are interested in CPR training. There’s certainly an absolute sea of misconceptions about CPR, but there are five specific ones that stick out in our minds.

You Can Be Sued If You Perform Bystander CPR

This one is by far the most common myth we hear about! Thankfully, if you provide emergency medical assistance to someone with First Aid or CPR, Good Samaritan laws will protect you, just as long as you’ve acted reasonably and prudently. However, if you were negligent in providing care, were reckless, or abandoned the victim after providing your initial care, the Good Samaritan law may not apply.

You Can Contract HIV from CPR

Some people are actually reluctant to perform CPR because they’re worried that they’ll contract HIV through it. This risk is absolutely minimal though as the person giving CPR would have to come into contact with the victim’s blood, semen, or vaginal fluid to have it transmitted. If necessary though, there are even barrier devices that can be used if you need to perform mouth-to-mouth resuscitation.

Mouth-to-Mouth Resuscitation Is Always Necessary

Continuing on with the previous point, you can always even skip mouth-to-mouth resuscitation anyway. The truth is that chest compression is the most effective way of giving someone CPR – not mouth-to-mouth resuscitation. In fact, CPR that only includes chest compressions can typically be just as successful as standard CPR. Since 2008, the American Heart Association has even recommended using only chest compression for adults.

Incorrect CPR Can Kill a Person

Many people are actually afraid to perform CPR because they’re worried that their actions can kill the person that they’re just trying to help. The truth is that CPR can only help someone, even if it’s not performed perfectly. The point of CPR is just to prolong someone’s life until paramedics can reach the victim. When CPR is performed, a person is already clinically dead as his or her heart has stopped beating. By performing chest compressions, you’re keeping oxygen going to the person’s brain. The heart can be restarted, but when oxygen stops flowing to the brain, the brain will die off and there’ll be no chance of reviving the person.

CPR Always Works

Unfortunately, this isn’t the truth either. While Hollywood may make it seem like everyone is always miraculously revived through CPR, it’s sadly not the case. First, as we just mentioned, CPR alone won’t save someone; it’s just to keep a patient alive until a medical professional arrives with a defibrillator. Also, the survival rate of patients suffering cardiac arrest out of the hospital is at anywhere from two to 15 percent. However, if CPR is administered immediately and an AED is used, the survival rate can go up to 30 percent. While it’s better than nothing, the odds still aren’t in the victim’s favor.

Contact Your Corona BLS Certification and ACLS Certification Providers!

If you’re in search of CPR training, ACLS certification, or BLS certification in Corona, you’ve come to the right place! Feel free to give us a call at (714) 960-1911 if you’d like to sign up for any of our classes. Also, please don’t ever hesitate to contact us if you have any questions or concerns. We can’t wait to hear from you!

Hits: 70
0

Posted by on in Safety

Blood is something that most people don’t think about on a regular basis, since it’s busy flowing throughout our bodies, out of sight and out of mind. We’re also not strangers to our own blood, from a simple paper cut to a bloody nose, we may get a bit squeamish but it’s nothing too out of the ordinary. However, what most people aren’t prepared for is what to do with another person’s blood, especially if it gets on you in some way. 

You may come in contact with another person’s blood due to a number of reasons, such as playing sports and coming into contact with someone who has a cut or performing first aid on someone in need. At OC Safety, preparing people for emergency situations is what we do, so we’ll be looking at what the risks and necessary steps are for when you come in contact with someone else's blood. 

The Biggest Dangers Of Getting Someone’s Blood On You

Coming into contact with another person’s blood does have risks, specifically something known as a BBV, or “blood-born virus”.  BBV’s are typically only transferred through the sharing (willing or unwilling) of bodily fluids such as blood and sometimes saliva that has been mixed with blood in the mouth.  While there are many types of BBV’s, the most dangerous and well-known ones are:

  • HIV
  • Hepatitis B
  • Hepatitis C

Your risk of contracting these viruses when you come into contact with a person’s blood that has any of them, depends on where the blood came into contact with you.

How Blood-Born Viruses Are Contracted

You are only at risk of contracting a BBV if the other person’s blood comes into contact with a route of transmission, which is typically a cut on your body that the infected blood can enter your own bloodstream. It is also possible to contract the viruses if the blood comes into contact with exposed body parts such as your eyes, mouth, or nose, but the risk is much lower.

Step-By-Step Guide If You Come Into Contact With Someone Else’s Blood

Below are the immediate steps to take if you get someone’s blood on you. In most cases where a person is exposed to a BBV, it is possible to halt the infection of the virus in the first 72 hour after exposure.

  1. Clean The Area - Wash off the blood with soap and running water.  For blood in the eyes, take out any contact lenses and rinse thoroughly. For blood in the mouth, rinse your mouth and spit out the water (do not swallow the water). 
  2. Assess The Risk - If the blood got on an open wound or in an exposed area, you may be at a higher risk of contracting a BBV. If the blood was on unbroken skin, you are at very low risk of contracting a virus. If possible, find out if the person does have any transferrable BBV’s that you could have been exposed to. 
  3. Consult A Medical Professional - If you did come into contact with a BBV and are at risk of infection, contact the accident and emergency department at your local hospital to get a assessment from a trained medical professional.

How Being First Aid Certified Can Help

By being first aid certified, you will be armed with the knowledge of what to do in crisis situation, allowing to be calm and collected in emergencies that require quick thinking and reactions. At OC Safety, we offer professionally led first aid certification and safety classes that will help you protect yourself, those you care about, and the people around you. These classes will teach you what to do in medical emergencies, such as coming into contact with someone else’s blood and assessing the risk of contracting a blood-born virus. 

Contact OC Safety To Prepare Yourself For Any Situation!

If you want to be more prepared when you’re faced with a medical emergency, sign up for a first aid certification program with your local Orange, CA safety training experts! We at OC Safety  offer a wide range of classes to help you be more knowledgeable and capable when it comes to crucial first aid techniques.  If you have any questions about what to do in certain emergency situations, or would like to schedule a class with us, contact us today!

Hits: 172
0

Posted by on in Safety

Here at OC Safety, it’s our goal to provide everyone in and around Orange County, CA with the BLS certification and first aid certification needed to help out in emergency situations. We’re proud to provide our BLS training to everyone, from doctors and paramedics to those in the general public. If you’re thinking about getting BLS certification and learning about these training techniques, we’ll be glad to give you a few reasons why it’s a great idea to do so.

The Basics of BLS Training

BLS (Basic Life Support) training is the most basic type of certification for helping to revive those who happen to be incapacitated. Getting certified in BLS is a relatively quick training period where you’ll learn about how to revive, resuscitate, or simply sustain someone who’s experiencing cardiac arrest, respiratory failure, or any similar condition where the breathing or heart rate has been compromised.

Why You Should Get BLS Training

There’s no greater reason for why you need BLS training than just by simply saying that it saves lives. In an emergency situation where someone has a heart attack or stops breathing, you’ll be able to administer techniques to keep the blood pumping throughout the body and maintain the flow of oxygenated blood to the brain. This is especially vital because even if you aren’t able to resuscitate the victim at that moment, you’re giving that person a greater chance of recovery when the paramedics arrive. The longer the victim goes without blood pumping throughout the body, the more of a chance that brain damage and other complications will occur, lessening that person’s chances of survival.

Also, it’s important to mention that over 80 percent of cardiac arrest cases occur at home or in a similar setting. This means that the most likely scenario where you’d need to use this training is in a location that’s mainly reserved for your friends and family. These are the people whose lives you may end up saving.

Contact Your Orange County, CA BLS Certification Providers!

If you’re interested in any of the classes that we offer, from BLS training to first aid certification, we encourage you to sign up online or by giving us a call at (714) 960-1911. Please feel free to contact us if you have any questions or concerns. We look forward to seeing you and helping you achieve certification!

Hits: 280
0

At OC Safety, it’s our job to provide everyone in and around Orange County, CA with the CPR certification needed to treat patients in emergency situations. CPR is a lifesaving, but intense procedure that requires chest compressions to resuscitate a patient. When performing chest compressions, it’s suggested that each compression be about two inches (five centimeters) deep. Now, if you stop to think about it, you’ll probably realize that pushing two inches deep into a person’s chest seems extreme and way beyond what a person would be used to. And it is. Pushing that deep may even lead to a scary situation where you hear a patient’s rib break.

What Should I Do If There’s a Rib Break?

Keep going. It’s as simple as that, no matter how unsettling it may be. Sure, broken ribs hurt…a lot…and your patient will likely feel that pain when he or she gets up. However, everyone would agree that the preferred option is to have a broken rib and still be alive. Patients understand what’s at stake when CPR has to be performed and there’s almost zero cases of them significantly complaining about what had to be done. It may be worrisome to feel a rib break, but this is actually completely normal. It’s estimated that about 30 percent of patients will end up with a fractured or broken rib after proper CPR is performed.

Are All Patients at Risk for Broken Bones?

While all patients are at risk for broken bones, there are some people who are more at risk than others. These include:

  • Skinnier patients
  • Older patients
  • Patients suffering from osteoporosis
  • Patients whose CPR provider is someone with a lot of upper body strength

Contact Your Orange County, CA CPR Certification Providers Today!

If you have any further questions about CPR, please don’t hesitate to contact us. We at OC Safety are glad to help you in any way we can. If you’d like to sign up for any of the classes that we offer, you can do so online or by giving us a call at (714) 960-1911. We can’t wait to help you on your path to CPR certification!

 

Hits: 373
0

We Donate To

CONTACT US

OC SAFETY FIRST AID
1940 N. Tustin St, Suite #103
Orange, CA 92865

SOCIAL

ocsafety