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At OC Safety, it’s our job to provide everyone in and around Orange County, CA with the CPR certification needed to treat patients in emergency situations. CPR is a lifesaving, but intense procedure that requires chest compressions to resuscitate a patient. When performing chest compressions, it’s suggested that each compression be about two inches (five centimeters) deep. Now, if you stop to think about it, you’ll probably realize that pushing two inches deep into a person’s chest seems extreme and way beyond what a person would be used to. And it is. Pushing that deep may even lead to a scary situation where you hear a patient’s rib break.

What Should I Do If There’s a Rib Break?

Keep going. It’s as simple as that, no matter how unsettling it may be. Sure, broken ribs hurt…a lot…and your patient will likely feel that pain when he or she gets up. However, everyone would agree that the preferred option is to have a broken rib and still be alive. Patients understand what’s at stake when CPR has to be performed and there’s almost zero cases of them significantly complaining about what had to be done. It may be worrisome to feel a rib break, but this is actually completely normal. It’s estimated that about 30 percent of patients will end up with a fractured or broken rib after proper CPR is performed.

Are All Patients at Risk for Broken Bones?

While all patients are at risk for broken bones, there are some people who are more at risk than others. These include:

  • Skinnier patients
  • Older patients
  • Patients suffering from osteoporosis
  • Patients whose CPR provider is someone with a lot of upper body strength

Contact Your Orange County, CA CPR Certification Providers Today!

If you have any further questions about CPR, please don’t hesitate to contact us. We at OC Safety are glad to help you in any way we can. If you’d like to sign up for any of the classes that we offer, you can do so online or by giving us a call at (714) 960-1911. We can’t wait to help you on your path to CPR certification!

 

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Thank you for visiting our blog! Here at OC Safety, it is our goal to help each of our students build up their confidence assisting in first aid care and medical emergencies at their own pace so they can be 100% sure they can help people appropriately. Our CPR and First Aid Training Center was established in 2009 by a local firefighter and paramedic who both dealt with life-threatening emergencies of their own. Together they decided that they wanted to establish a company that provides education and training not only to medical personnel like themselves, but to any men, women or children who are interested in learning how to make a difference in the community. In the classes that we offer, you can learn anything from CPR, to assisting in medical emergencies such as heart attack, stroke & cardiac arrest.

Detecting Dehydration

Dehydration is a potentially serious condition experienced when someone loses more fluid than they take in. Young children and older people are the most likely to get dehydrated, so it is especially important for them to drink plenty of water.

The main causes of dehydration are:

  • Excessive sweating during physical activity or hot weather conditions
  • Sweating because of a high fever
  • Severe diarrhea and/or vomiting

If left untreated, dehydration can potentially lead to heat exhaustion and heat stroke.

Symptoms of Dehydration

The following are the key signs that may tell you someone is dehydrated:

  • Dry mouth or eyes
  • Dry, cracked lips
  • Headaches, dizziness, or confusion
  • Muscle cramping or tightness
  • A reduction in urination, and dark-colored urine

Treatment - What You Should Do

When you suspect someone is suffering from dehydration, adhere to the following first aid steps:

  • Sit the patient down in a cool place
  • Give them plenty of water or Oral Rehydration Solution to drink
  • If the patient is suffering from any painful cramps, help them stretch and massage the affected areas
  • Monitor how they are feeling and record vital signs (pulse, respiratory rate) if trained to do so
  • If they still feel unwell once they are rehydrated then encourage them to see a doctor ASAP

Contact Your Orange County, CA First Aid Experts Today

Here at OC Safety, we are committed to providing you with the best training at the best price, so we will gladly price match any other Authorized American Heart Association Training Site. If you are at all interested in learning how to assist in medical emergencies for members of your community, we strongly encourage you to reach out to us and sign up for a class. Our classes won’t take up much of your time, and will leave you feeling confident and proud of your decision to be of service to others. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to give us a call at (714) 960-1911 or fill out an online form on our contact page. We are excited to hear from you soon!

 

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It is common for new parents to be both very excited and nervous when welcoming a new baby into their lives. Many new parents feel afraid that they don’t know everything they should regarding taking care of their babies. If you are a new parent who is concerned that you lack the knowledge and skills you need to tend to all your baby’s needs, you’re certainly not alone as most first-time moms and dads can relate to how you feel. Just remember, that as time moves on you will acquire the knowledge and skills you need to provide your baby with the tender loving care he or she needs.

One skill that every new parent should have is the ability to effectively provide CPR or cardiopulmonary resuscitation as it is literally a life-saving skill. CPR can restore breathing and circulation until emergency personnel arrive. Below are some of the situations that can arise with your young child that could result in him or her needing CPR in order to survive until medical help arrives:

  • Accidents
  • Choking
  • Near-drowning
  • Poisoning
  • Head trauma
  • Smoke inhalation
  • Electrical shock
  • Severe asthma

Taking baby CPR training will give you the knowledge and skills you need to restore blood flow to the brain, heart and other vital organs. CPR also restores breathing until medical assistance arrives on the scene. When you’ve completed infant CPR training, you’re given the peace of mind knowing that you’ll know what to do to in order save your child’s life in case of a serious emergency.

Sign up for an Orange County Baby CPR Class

OC Safety provides infant first aid and infant CPR training in Orange County. You can call us directly at (714) 960-1911 or find a class to take that fits your schedule. Our classes are interesting and fun to take and will teach you all the skills you need to effectively provide CPR to your child or someone else’s child should an emergency situation arise.

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OC Safety strives to provide the best in CPR training for those located in or around Orange County, CA. While it goes without saying how important of a role CPR plays in our lives and the lives of our loved ones, what usually goes unsaid is that some of our loved ones are actually our furry little friends. Whether your animal of choice is a dog or a cat, we usually take their companionship and cuddliness for granted, but what happens when our poor furbabies find themselves struggling for air?

Pets dedicate their lives toward loving and helping us humans in any way they can. They express their love and share their cuteness with us through the endless amount of cuddling after we’ve had a hard day, listening to all our troubles, keeping us company while we’re lonely, or even posing for instagram-worthy photo and video. 

As their best friend, the least we can do is learn pet CPR and be prepared in case of emergency. While we don’t offer pet CPR training, we’re more than happy to give you the basics in case the unthinkable happens to our fluffy friend!

How to Perform CPR on Your Pet

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If your pet becomes unconscious, first and foremost – don’t panic! As traumatic and terrifying as this may be, you will need to stay calm during this process. Just like if a human would fall unconscious, you’re going to have to immediately perform CPR on the little guy. The procedure of performing CPR on your pet (let’s say dog) is as follows:

  • First, you need to lay your dog on his or her side on a flat surface.
  • Check to see if your dog is still breathing. You can do this by watching the movement of your dog’s chest or feeling for it with your hand. You can also check by placing your hand in front of your dog’s nose to feel for breath. A clear sign that your dog isn’t getting enough oxygen is if the gums are blue or gray.
  • If your dog isn’t breathing, you’ll first want to make sure that the airway is clear. Extend the head and neck, open your dog’s mouth, and look to see if there are any foreign objects inside. If there’s an object blocking the airway, grab the tongue and pull it outward. If this isn’t enough to get the object out, use your fingers or a tool such as pliers to grab it and pull it out. Please be careful not to push the object in farther.
  • If the object cannot be pulled out, you’ll have to try the Heimlich maneuver. To perform the Heimlich maneuver, you’ll put one hand on your dog’s back and the other on the belly, below the ribs. With your hand on the dog’s belly, give several sharp pushes inward and upward. Check for foreign objects in the dog’s mouth and remove them. After that, close the mouth and give a few small breaths through your dog’s nose. Repeat this process until you’re sure that the airway is cleared.
  • When the airway is cleared, lift your dog’s chin to make sure his or her neck and throat is as straight as possible.
  • Hold your dog’s mouth shut and gently breathe into the nose. By doing this, the chest should slightly expand.
  • Wait until the air has left your dog’s lungs before you breathe in again. You should take one breath about every four seconds. Continue this until your dog starts breathing on his or her own or the heartbeat stops. Keep monitoring your dog’s heartbeat during this process.
  • If your dog’s heart has stopped beating, you’ll want to start giving chest compressions. The size of the dog will determine the way you perform the compressions. For puppies, you should probably only use your thumb. For bigger dogs, you’ll use either use all your fingers or your palm. You should squeeze the chest to approximately half of its normal thickness or about one inch inward.
  • Compress the chest at a rate of about 80 to 100 times per minute. Make sure to alternate one breath for every five compressions.

It’s important to note that a dog’s heart will keep beating for several minutes after he or she stops breathing. If your dog’s heart stops beating at any point, you’ll need to immediately begin chest compressions in order to keep the blood pumping.

Similarities and Differences of Human and Pet CPR

Performing CPR on humans is very similar to performing it on pets because the concept is the same. You’re performing CPR in order to circulate blood and also breathing to attempt to oxygenate the system. However, there are still a couple of key differences. Some of these differences include:

  • With humans, you start with chest compressions right away before moving on to the airway and performing rescue breathing. With pets, you start by checking the airway.
  • There’s also a difference between the breathing rate. While you’ll be giving two rescue breaths after every 30 chest compressions on a human, you should give about one breath after every five compressions on a dog.
  • Obviously, dogs are small, soft, and innocent animals – they can’t take quite the punishment that a human can. Therefore, when performing chest compressions, you’re going to be more forceful when it’s a human rather than a little furbaby.

Having said that, CPR is mostly the same between humans and pets. Just remember this – with humans, you’ll want to follow the C-A-B method (compressions, airway, breathing). Pets follow the A-B-C method (airway, breathing, compressions).

Contact OC Safety Today!

If you would like to learn more about CPR, feel free to contact us with any of your questions or concerns. If you’re interested in registering for our classes, you can do so online or by giving us a call at (714) 960-1911. We look forward to seeing you and we sincerely hope you put this knowledge to good use; your dog will thank you for it! Woof!

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The team at OC Safety routinely provides companies of all sizes and types with on-site first aid training that is OSHA-compliant in and around Orange County and Santa Ana. If you're an employer who is considering providing your employees with on-site first aid training, you should be aware of OSHA's first aid training requirements so you can decide if you need to invest in this training or just instruct your workers to call 911 and wait for assistance to arrive. OC Safety offers on-site training for various industries including construction, aerospace, landscaping and agriculture. We also provide on-site training for the city of Santa Ana.

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Here are some of the OSHA's main requirements regarding companies providing first aid training. 

Medical Treatment Must Be Available for Your Employees 

Under OSHA's guidelines, employers must ensure that either medical treatment for all injured employees is in “near proximity” or that someone at the workplace is adequately trained to render first aid. Concerning what “near proximity” means, OSHA states that a workplace with a hazardous setting (factories, warehouses, etc.) must be within 3 to 4 minutes response time from medical services in case of serious hazards and injuries from:

  • Falls 
  • Suffocation
  • Electrocution 
  • Amputation 
  • Uncontrolled breathing 
  • Breathing cessation 
  • Cardiac arrest 

For employees in lower-hazard settings such as offices, OSHA states that up to a 15-minute response time could be acceptable.

First Aid Training Must Be Tailored to Your Work Site 

OSHA states that employers must ensure that the first aid training they provide employees is tailored to their work site. This means for example, if your employers work outdoors, they should receive first aid training that teaches them how to treat injuries arising from temperature extremes and how to respond heat exhaustion and heat stroke. 

What First Aid Training Must Include 

First aid training that is OSHA compliant must include teaching workers how to administer one-time treatment for minor injuries including lacerations, abrasions, bruises, first-degree burns, sprains and splinters. 

You Must Be Aware of State-Specific Requirements

In addition to Federal OSHA first aid requirements, employers must also be aware of state-specific requirements. For example, Under California OSHA regulations, a consulting physician must approve an employer’s first aid materials in writing. You can learn more detailed information about OSHA's standards and regulations by visiting the official OSHA website. 

Contact OC Safety

Whether you need more information about OSHA first aid training requirements for your business or wish to sign up for on-site first aid training for your workers, the team at OC Safety is here for you! We will gladly answer any questions you may have so don't hesitate to contact us.

We encourage all employers to provide first aid training to their workers to ensure that people with injuries are given the help they need while waiting for emergency responders to arrive. It's important to remember that just one minute can make the difference between life and death so it's always best to have someone on staff trained in first aid just in case.

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1940 N. Tustin St, Suite #103
Orange, CA 92865

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