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There are many types of seizures that can affect the entire brain or certain parts of it, causing a wide range of symptoms from loss of consciousness and minor twitching to violent convulsions. The type of seizure that most people are familiar with are known as tonic-clonic seizures, where the person falls down and begins shaking aggressively until the seizure subsides. This is one of the few types of seizures that are classified as major seizures, and knowing how to respond when you notice someone having a seizure can help save their life.

At OC Safety, we help people make a difference in their community, providing them with the skills and knowledge they need to be able to respond quickly and correctly in the event of emergency to protect those around them, whether they are family, friends, or strangers. To make sure you are ready to face the unexpected, below is a detailed guide on what you should do if you see someone having a seizure.

The Stages Of A Common Tonic-Clonic Seizure

The first step of reacting to an emergency is understanding the situation and what you’re dealing with. For the case the of tonic-clonic seizures, they are broken down into two main stages:

  • Tonic Stage - the first stage involves a sudden complete or partial loss of consciousness and tightening of the skeletal muscles, often resulting in the patient falling over. It is common for the patient to let out a load moan or other sounds as the air is being expelled from their lungs. This phase typically only lasts for a few seconds.
  • Clonic Stage - in the second stage of the seizure, the patient will start to experience convulsions caused by their muscles rapidly contracting and relaxing. The convulsions can vary in terms of their severity, ranging from small, exaggerated twitches to aggressive shaking and stiffened limbs or extremities. Other movement is common during the clonic stage, such as rolling over or stretching out the body and curling back up. Other signs that the patient has entered the clonic stage of the seizure are they eyes rolling back, closing their eyes, and the lips becoming a slight tint of blue.

A full tonic-clonic seizure typically lasts anywhere between 1 and 3 minutes, and is considered a medical emergency if it lasts for over 5 minutes. Recovering from a seizure can take anywhere between a few minutes to several hours, with common symptoms being drowsiness or lethargy.

What Not To Do When Someone Is Experiencing A Seizure

Many onlookers who witness someone having a seizure are often shocked by the rapid, violent convulsions of the clonic stage. For those that have the urge to help, a common assumption that they make is that the convulsions need to be stopped. This gave rose to the myth that you should try to restrain a seizure victim in an attempt to stop the convulsions. In reality, you should never restrain someone who is having a seizure, since it can increase their risk of injuring themselves and possibly injuring you.

The second myth stems from the fact that during a major seizure, the victim is often likely to bite down on their own tongue or the inside of their mouth, which can lead to bruising or soreness as they recover. Someone started spreading the myth that people having a seizure can potentially bite their own tongue off, so to prevent that, you should put something in their mouth during their convulsions. Do not put anything in a victim’s mouth during a seizure, since it can cause them to choke or block their airway when they start to recover.

Step By Step First Aid For Seizure Response

Now that you’re familiar with what happens during a seizure and what not to do, the steps for how to properly care for someone who is experiencing a seizure is rather simple. The steps for responding to a victim having a major seizure are:

  1. Call for medical help immediately
  2. Usher bystanders & onlookers away to create space around the victim
  3. Clear the area of any potential hazards that could injure the victim
  4. Protect the victim’s head
  5. Wait until the seizure subsides
  6. Once the seizure is finished, move the victim so they are laying on their side
  7. Ensure that they are breathing and there are no obstructions in their airway
  8. If the victim stops breathing, immediately begin CPR and call for a defibrillator
  9. Let the victim recover at their own pace. Do not panic or ask rapid questions that could cause the victim stress.

The proper way of helping a seizure victim is to let the seizure run its course, while doing your best to create a safer environment for the victim and ensuring that they can breathe after the seizure has subsided.

Contact OC Safety & Get Prepared!

If you want to be ready to handle the unexpected, contact us at OC Safety or schedule a safety certification course with us. We offer professional on-site safety training and certification programs for CPR, first aid, basic life support (BLS), and more, so you can have the tools and skill that you need to respond to any emergency. If you have questions about the classes that we offer, or about what to do when you see someone having a seizure, just reach out to us and we’ll be happy to provide you with the information you need.

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Busting Myths About Blood Borne Pathogens

Busting Myths About Blood Borne PathogensAt OC Safety, our mission is to create a safer world by providing the high-quality safety training courses that first responders, medical professionals, and other workers in dangerous environments need to protect and save lives. While many workplace dangers are clear and obvious, there are many hazards that aren't so easy to spot upon first glance. Blood borne pathogens are an example of these dangers. BBPs include conditions like HIV, Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, Herpes Simplex Virus 1 & 2, and many more viruses and microorganisms. To help clarify the dangers of and best practices for avoiding blood borne pathogens (BBPs), we wanted to dispel a few common myths about blood borne pathogens.

Top Myths About Blood Borne Pathogens

BBPs are dangerous: though invisible, exposure to even a minuscule amount of blood can cause infection transmission. However there are many myths about BBPs. Here are a few blood borne pathogen myths we can put to rest for good:

  • Myth: Vaccinations Guarantee Protection. While vaccinations do help to prevent infection from a pathogen or illness, they aren't 100% effective and don't guarantee your safety if you're exposed to a BBP. Even if you've received all standard vaccines, you should still seek treatment after being exposed to blood.
  • Myth: There's No Way to Prevent Infection After Exposure. While the best option is always to prevent exposure, there are still steps you can take if you've been exposed to blood. Many pathogens can be prevented retroactively after an exposure so long as you seek immediate treatment.
  • Myth: Viruses Stop Being Contagious When Exposed to Oxygen. While many viruses break down when exposed to air outside the body, there are a host of environmental processes that can delay or prevent this process. Many viruses can even lie dormant outside of a host for years, remaining dangerous long after exiting a host.

The Importance of OSHA Blood Borne Pathogen Certification

We're glad to put an end to these BBP myths, but unfortunately, there's much more misinformation about BBPs and proper BBP protocol. Thankfully, OC Safety offers a Blood Borne Pathogen Certification Class that provides comprehensive training on how to handle blood safely, how to minimize or eliminate the risk of exposure to BBPs, and what to do in case of exposure. For anyone that risks coming into contact with human blood on a regular basis, be they a nurse, paramedic, firefighter, or even tattoo artist, Blood Borne Pathogen Certification is vital to preventing BBP exposure and staying healthy.

Contact Orange County Safety Training Course Experts

Whether you yourself work in an environment with a risk for BBP exposure or you manage employees who are at risk, Blood Borne Pathogen Certification is vital. At OC Safety, we're proud to offer a comprehensive Blood Borne Pathogen Certification course that's fully compliant with all OSHA and regulatory standards. Get the protection that you and your team need: contact OC Safety today to sign up for safety classes for yourself and your organization!

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The Truth About Online ACLS Certification

For those looking to get their certification for Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS), online certification programs offers a level of convenience and flexibility that’s hard to beat as it can easily fit within anyone’s busy schedule. However, online ACLS certification programs do have a few downsides that can catch you off guard if you don’t know what to look for. To make sure that you know everything that you need to know before you invest your time and money in taking an online ACLS certification course, your local Orange County safety training experts here at OC Safety have put together this helpful guide. Check out the information below to learn more!

The Validity Of Online ACLS Programs

Unfortunately, even if you complete an online ACLS certification program, it does not mean that your certification is valid, as there are different types of programs that can give you varying levels of ACLS training. Since most people who will be getting certified for ACLS are professionals that need to be certified for their job, the validity of the certification is ultimately up to their employer. The requirements for accepted ACLS certification will vary from company to company, and since online programs provide you with a limited form of training, some employers may not accept the online certification.

No Endorsement From The American Heart Association (AHA)

Online ACLS certification programs are not endorsed or accredited by the American Heart Association, meaning that completing that kind of training will not get you an AHA ACLS certification card, which is often required by employers. The reason that online programs are not approved by the AHA is because if the course is completed completely online, it only requires a cognitive assessment and no in-person skills assessment. For AHA ACLS certification, passing an in-person skills assessment is necessary, which means that you would need to take a course at an AHA authorized training facility such as OC Safety here in Orange County, CA.

Are Online ACLS Certification Courses Bad?

Even though online ACLS certification programs do not provide you with a complete AHA ACLS certification, it does not mean that they are bad. Simply put, they are just not a good match for professional who need a full certification in ACLS, as it would take extra time and resources to go through another program in addition to the online course in order to complete their skills assessment. However, for those whose employers only require a basic level of certification for ACLS, online programs are convenient, flexible, and cost effective. All you have to do is check with your employer to see what kind of certification you need.

Get ACLS Certified From An AHA Authorized Training Center

If you’re looking for a full AHA ACLS certification, register for a certification program at our AHA authorized training facility here at OC Safety. With our local training center here in Orange, CA, we offer on-site ACLS skills training and assessments, led by industry professionals including firefighters, registered nurses, and paramedics. To sign up for your program, just view our calendar, find the next available date for ACLS training, click on it, and fill out the form with your information. If you have any questions about our ACLS program, or any of our other first aid and CPR classes, just contact us and a member of our staff will be more than happy to provide you with all the information you need.

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CPR Tips & Tricks

CPR is a vital life saving tool that can be used in a wide range of emergencies such as heart attacks are cases of near-drowning, helping restore a person’s heartbeat and breathing if they lose consciousness. The process of providing CPR is fairly simple, but even those who have undergone training and have become certified to provide CPR, emergency situations can still catch you off guard, making it difficult to think clearly and act quickly when necessary. To make things easier, your trusted provider for first aid and CPR training, OC Safety, is here with some helpful CPR tips and tricks that can help you when you’re facing a sudden, emergency scenario.

Always Call For Help First

While CPR can help save someone’s life in the moment, they may still need additional medical treatment, which is why it’s only meant to be used as a tool to keep someone in a stable condition until medical professionals arrive. The most important thing to do before you start administering CPR to someone is to first call 911, or get someone else on the scene to call 911 so professional medical assistance will arrive to help as soon as possible.

Hands-Only CPR

If you’re the only person in a position to help someone in need, but you're not certified to give CPR or even if your certification is expired, there is still something you can do to potentially save that person’s life. Hands-only CPR involved doing chest compressions until medical help arrives.

To perform Hand-only CPR, position yourself over the person’s chest and place the heel of one of your hands (the part closest to your wrist) at the center of the person’s chest with your fingers stretched out. Take your other hand and place it top of your other hand, gripping between the fingers of your first hand. Then, start pressing down hard and fast against the person’s chest, keeping your arms straight.

Syncing Up A Favorite Song To Compressions

The ideal rate for chest compressions is about 100 beats per minute (BPM), but being able to consistently get that rate exactly right when you’re providing CPR can be difficult. However, there are plenty of songs out there that have a similar BPM, which means that all it takes to get the perfect rate of chest compressions is to hum one of those songs. Some examples include “Stayin’ Alive” by the Bee Gees, “Crazy In Love” by Beyonce and Jay Z, and "Something Just Like This" by the Chainsmokers and Coldplay. Just do a quick search online to find one of your favorite songs that is close to 100 BPM and you can always remember it as your CPR song.

Spell “CAB”

In the moment, it can be easy to get mixed up and panicked when trying to deliver CPR. If you ever have trouble remember the order of steps you need to follow for CPR, The American Heart Association has a simple tip that can help. Just spell “C-A-B” which stands for “compressions, airway, breathing”.

Get CPR Certified With OC Safety!

Getting CPR certified is quick, easy, and will give you the tools that you need to act fast in emergency situations and provide loved ones, family members, or strangers with care that can save their life. All you need to do is book your CPR certification courses with OC Safety, your local provider for CPR and first aid training in Orange, CA. If you have any questions about getting CPR certified, or would like to know more about our other first aid training courses, just contact us and we’ll be happy to provide you with all the information you need.

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CPR, First Aid, and BLS: Are They All The Same?

OC Safety is proud to provide comprehensive safety training classes to the residents of Orange County, CA. Our mission is to promote personal and public health by equipping individuals, from parents and teachers to healthcare professions, with the skills to protect lives. ln all of our premier safety training courses, you will be taught how to recognize and respond to various emergency situations.

The aim of CPR/AED Certification, BLS certification, and First Aid training classes is simple: to prepare you to save lives. But what are the differences between these three life-saving methods? Continue reading below to learn more, and register to receive your CPR & First Aid Certification or BLS Certification today!

What is CPR?

CPR stands for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation. When somebody’s heart stops functioning effectively and/or they stop breathing, CPR is used to continue getting healthy, oxygenated blood to the body’s vital organs in order to keep that person alive. Providing CPR generally involves performing chest compressions to circulate blood throughout the body, as well as administering mouth-to-mouth breaths to oxygenate that blood.

What is First Aid?

First aid is a set of skills that, when put into practice, can help immediately stabilize and treat an individual who is injured or ill until more comprehensive medical resources and/or professionals become available. The main aims of first aid are to preserve life and prevent conditions from worsening. First aid can be used to deal with a wide range of scenarios, from broken bones to insect bites/stings to cardiac arrest.

What is BLS?

The acronym BLS stands for Basic Life Support. Most often used on individuals who are experiencing cardiac arrest or respiratory distress, BLS requires the knowledge of CPR, as well as the ability to operate an automated external defibrillator (AED). 

Get Your CPR AED Certification, First Aid Certification, or BLS Certification Today!

As you can see, all three of these main certifications - CPR, First Aid, and BLS - have individual nuances, but they are all designed to help you know how to recognize and respond to emergency medical situations until medical professionals arrive or a patient can be taken to a hospital.

We’re proud to help the residents of Orange County develop the skills to save lives. If you’d like to sign up for any of the classes that we offer, you can contact us online or call us at (714) 960-1911. We look forward to working with you!

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Knowing how the body reacts in extreme temperatures essential to keep yourself and others safe when if you ever find yourself in a dangerous situation. When it comes to extremely cold temperatures, one if the immediate dangers that people face is frostbite, which can cause even more damage to the body if not treated properly. Today, the first aid and safety experts here at OC Safety will be breaking down what frostbite is, they symptoms to look out for, and how to treat it effectively and efficiently.

Understanding Frostbite

Frostbite is a condition when the skin and the tissue underneath freezes, and often happens in temperatures that are below freezing. The most common areas of the body that become afflicted by frostbite are any skin that is exposed, such as the nose, cheeks, ears, and chin. Those with poor circulations to certain extremities like their toes and fingers also have a higher risk of getting frostbite in those areas. When the skin and the tissue freezes, the body reacts by constricting blood vessels in the frozen areas in an effort to keep your overall core temperature stable and prevent the onset of hypothermia.  The most common causes of frostbite are exposure the extremely cold weather, or direct skin contact with ice or other materials that are at a temperature below freezing.

What Are The Symptoms Of Frostbite?

While many people may imagine a body part turning black as the obvious sign of frostbite, it is actually only the last and most severe stage of frostbite. In total, there are about 4 different degrees of frostbite, each with different symptoms based on the extent that the tissue has frozen. The degrees and their symptoms are as follows:

1st Degree Frostbite - Often referred to as “frostnip”, the skin begins to turn pale or red in color. The skin is also cold to the touch, giving off very little warmth as the upper layers of the tissue have begun to freeze. Frostnip often gives a sensation of itching, tingling, or feeling slightly numb.

2nd Degree Frostbite - the skin begins to turn a pale yellow color that resembles wax, and some ice crystal may be apparent on the outside layers of skin. The affected area will often become swollen and create a painful burning sensation. 

3rd/4th Degree Frostbite - at later stages, every layer of the skin down to the nerves and blood vessels have been frozen over. The most common symptoms and signs of this stage are complete numbness of the area, lack of ability to move, black coloration, and the tissue is hard to the touch.  It is difficult to know the severity of the damage at this stage, and is often only discernible after some time.

How To Treat Frostbite

There are two main methods of treating frostbite which involve thawing the frozen skin, but before we go over those, we need to talk about timing and preparation for treatment. If you don’t have access to a warmer environment for long while, it is recommended that you don’t attempt to treat the frostbite. This is because if the tissue is thawed and then refrozen, it can actually cause more harm to the body. If this is the case, it is recommended that you simply wrap the affected area and limit movement as much as possible, since the ice crystals under the skin can also cause damage when moving. Now onto the types of frostbite treatment.

Passive Rewarming - This method uses the person’s own body heat, or a heated environment, to thaw the frozen tissues and bring it back to a stable temperature.

Active Rewarming -  Active rewarming entails the application of heat directly onto the affected tissue, such as dipping a frostbitten hand into extremely hot water. This method is commonly used in conjunction with passive rewarming.

Both of these methods carry some risk, since the rapid return of blood flow to the frostbitten area can cause a sharp drop in the body’s core temperature and result in an irregular heartbeat. That is why treatment for frostbite is most often performed in a hospital with the assistance of a medical professional.

Contact OC Safety For More Helpful Information!

If you have any questions about how to deal with frostbite or identify early signs, contact the first aid and safety experts here at OC Safety. We offer first aid certification, HIPAA training, and CPR classes in Orange County, so you can be prepared with the vital skills to help you and your loved ones in times of need. Just contact us for more information on our classes, or book your courses by checking our calendar, which is updated regularly.

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Common Myths and Misconceptions About CPRAs your providers of CPR training, ACLS certification, and BLS certification in Corona, we at OC Safety want to give you the training needed to save a life if someone’s in danger. Through our CPR training courses, you’ll have the capability of helping someone who’s suffered from cardiac arrest. While we’re proud to provide proper training and information, there are unfortunately some myths and misconceptions about CPR lingering around that may have altered the views of people who are interested in CPR training. There’s certainly an absolute sea of misconceptions about CPR, but there are five specific ones that stick out in our minds.

You Can Be Sued If You Perform Bystander CPR

This one is by far the most common myth we hear about! Thankfully, if you provide emergency medical assistance to someone with First Aid or CPR, Good Samaritan laws will protect you, just as long as you’ve acted reasonably and prudently. However, if you were negligent in providing care, were reckless, or abandoned the victim after providing your initial care, the Good Samaritan law may not apply.

You Can Contract HIV from CPR

Some people are actually reluctant to perform CPR because they’re worried that they’ll contract HIV through it. This risk is absolutely minimal though as the person giving CPR would have to come into contact with the victim’s blood, semen, or vaginal fluid to have it transmitted. If necessary though, there are even barrier devices that can be used if you need to perform mouth-to-mouth resuscitation.

Mouth-to-Mouth Resuscitation Is Always Necessary

Continuing on with the previous point, you can always even skip mouth-to-mouth resuscitation anyway. The truth is that chest compression is the most effective way of giving someone CPR – not mouth-to-mouth resuscitation. In fact, CPR that only includes chest compressions can typically be just as successful as standard CPR. Since 2008, the American Heart Association has even recommended using only chest compression for adults.

Incorrect CPR Can Kill a Person

Many people are actually afraid to perform CPR because they’re worried that their actions can kill the person that they’re just trying to help. The truth is that CPR can only help someone, even if it’s not performed perfectly. The point of CPR is just to prolong someone’s life until paramedics can reach the victim. When CPR is performed, a person is already clinically dead as his or her heart has stopped beating. By performing chest compressions, you’re keeping oxygen going to the person’s brain. The heart can be restarted, but when oxygen stops flowing to the brain, the brain will die off and there’ll be no chance of reviving the person.

CPR Always Works

Unfortunately, this isn’t the truth either. While Hollywood may make it seem like everyone is always miraculously revived through CPR, it’s sadly not the case. First, as we just mentioned, CPR alone won’t save someone; it’s just to keep a patient alive until a medical professional arrives with a defibrillator. Also, the survival rate of patients suffering cardiac arrest out of the hospital is at anywhere from two to 15 percent. However, if CPR is administered immediately and an AED is used, the survival rate can go up to 30 percent. While it’s better than nothing, the odds still aren’t in the victim’s favor.

Contact Your Corona BLS Certification and ACLS Certification Providers!

If you’re in search of CPR training, ACLS certification, or BLS certification in Corona, you’ve come to the right place! Feel free to give us a call at (714) 960-1911 if you’d like to sign up for any of our classes. Also, please don’t ever hesitate to contact us if you have any questions or concerns. We can’t wait to hear from you!

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Blood is something that most people don’t think about on a regular basis, since it’s busy flowing throughout our bodies, out of sight and out of mind. We’re also not strangers to our own blood, from a simple paper cut to a bloody nose, we may get a bit squeamish but it’s nothing too out of the ordinary. However, what most people aren’t prepared for is what to do with another person’s blood, especially if it gets on you in some way. 

You may come in contact with another person’s blood due to a number of reasons, such as playing sports and coming into contact with someone who has a cut or performing first aid on someone in need. At OC Safety, preparing people for emergency situations is what we do, so we’ll be looking at what the risks and necessary steps are for when you come in contact with someone else's blood. 

The Biggest Dangers Of Getting Someone’s Blood On You

Coming into contact with another person’s blood does have risks, specifically something known as a BBV, or “blood-born virus”.  BBV’s are typically only transferred through the sharing (willing or unwilling) of bodily fluids such as blood and sometimes saliva that has been mixed with blood in the mouth.  While there are many types of BBV’s, the most dangerous and well-known ones are:

  • HIV
  • Hepatitis B
  • Hepatitis C

Your risk of contracting these viruses when you come into contact with a person’s blood that has any of them, depends on where the blood came into contact with you.

How Blood-Born Viruses Are Contracted

You are only at risk of contracting a BBV if the other person’s blood comes into contact with a route of transmission, which is typically a cut on your body that the infected blood can enter your own bloodstream. It is also possible to contract the viruses if the blood comes into contact with exposed body parts such as your eyes, mouth, or nose, but the risk is much lower.

Step-By-Step Guide If You Come Into Contact With Someone Else’s Blood

Below are the immediate steps to take if you get someone’s blood on you. In most cases where a person is exposed to a BBV, it is possible to halt the infection of the virus in the first 72 hour after exposure.

  1. Clean The Area - Wash off the blood with soap and running water.  For blood in the eyes, take out any contact lenses and rinse thoroughly. For blood in the mouth, rinse your mouth and spit out the water (do not swallow the water). 
  2. Assess The Risk - If the blood got on an open wound or in an exposed area, you may be at a higher risk of contracting a BBV. If the blood was on unbroken skin, you are at very low risk of contracting a virus. If possible, find out if the person does have any transferrable BBV’s that you could have been exposed to. 
  3. Consult A Medical Professional - If you did come into contact with a BBV and are at risk of infection, contact the accident and emergency department at your local hospital to get a assessment from a trained medical professional.

How Being First Aid Certified Can Help

By being first aid certified, you will be armed with the knowledge of what to do in crisis situation, allowing to be calm and collected in emergencies that require quick thinking and reactions. At OC Safety, we offer professionally led first aid certification and safety classes that will help you protect yourself, those you care about, and the people around you. These classes will teach you what to do in medical emergencies, such as coming into contact with someone else’s blood and assessing the risk of contracting a blood-born virus. 

Contact OC Safety To Prepare Yourself For Any Situation!

If you want to be more prepared when you’re faced with a medical emergency, sign up for a first aid certification program with your local Orange, CA safety training experts! We at OC Safety  offer a wide range of classes to help you be more knowledgeable and capable when it comes to crucial first aid techniques.  If you have any questions about what to do in certain emergency situations, or would like to schedule a class with us, contact us today!

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Here at OC Safety, it’s our goal to provide everyone in and around Orange County, CA with the BLS certification and first aid certification needed to help out in emergency situations. We’re proud to provide our BLS training to everyone, from doctors and paramedics to those in the general public. If you’re thinking about getting BLS certification and learning about these training techniques, we’ll be glad to give you a few reasons why it’s a great idea to do so.

The Basics of BLS Training

BLS (Basic Life Support) training is the most basic type of certification for helping to revive those who happen to be incapacitated. Getting certified in BLS is a relatively quick training period where you’ll learn about how to revive, resuscitate, or simply sustain someone who’s experiencing cardiac arrest, respiratory failure, or any similar condition where the breathing or heart rate has been compromised.

Why You Should Get BLS Training

There’s no greater reason for why you need BLS training than just by simply saying that it saves lives. In an emergency situation where someone has a heart attack or stops breathing, you’ll be able to administer techniques to keep the blood pumping throughout the body and maintain the flow of oxygenated blood to the brain. This is especially vital because even if you aren’t able to resuscitate the victim at that moment, you’re giving that person a greater chance of recovery when the paramedics arrive. The longer the victim goes without blood pumping throughout the body, the more of a chance that brain damage and other complications will occur, lessening that person’s chances of survival.

Also, it’s important to mention that over 80 percent of cardiac arrest cases occur at home or in a similar setting. This means that the most likely scenario where you’d need to use this training is in a location that’s mainly reserved for your friends and family. These are the people whose lives you may end up saving.

Contact Your Orange County, CA BLS Certification Providers!

If you’re interested in any of the classes that we offer, from BLS training to first aid certification, we encourage you to sign up online or by giving us a call at (714) 960-1911. Please feel free to contact us if you have any questions or concerns. We look forward to seeing you and helping you achieve certification!

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At OC Safety, it’s our job to provide everyone in and around Orange County, CA with the CPR certification needed to treat patients in emergency situations. CPR is a lifesaving, but intense procedure that requires chest compressions to resuscitate a patient. When performing chest compressions, it’s suggested that each compression be about two inches (five centimeters) deep. Now, if you stop to think about it, you’ll probably realize that pushing two inches deep into a person’s chest seems extreme and way beyond what a person would be used to. And it is. Pushing that deep may even lead to a scary situation where you hear a patient’s rib break.

What Should I Do If There’s a Rib Break?

Keep going. It’s as simple as that, no matter how unsettling it may be. Sure, broken ribs hurt…a lot…and your patient will likely feel that pain when he or she gets up. However, everyone would agree that the preferred option is to have a broken rib and still be alive. Patients understand what’s at stake when CPR has to be performed and there’s almost zero cases of them significantly complaining about what had to be done. It may be worrisome to feel a rib break, but this is actually completely normal. It’s estimated that about 30 percent of patients will end up with a fractured or broken rib after proper CPR is performed.

Are All Patients at Risk for Broken Bones?

While all patients are at risk for broken bones, there are some people who are more at risk than others. These include:

  • Skinnier patients
  • Older patients
  • Patients suffering from osteoporosis
  • Patients whose CPR provider is someone with a lot of upper body strength

Contact Your Orange County, CA CPR Certification Providers Today!

If you have any further questions about CPR, please don’t hesitate to contact us. We at OC Safety are glad to help you in any way we can. If you’d like to sign up for any of the classes that we offer, you can do so online or by giving us a call at (714) 960-1911. We can’t wait to help you on your path to CPR certification!

 

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Thank you for visiting our blog! Here at OC Safety, it is our goal to help each of our students build up their confidence assisting in first aid care and medical emergencies at their own pace so they can be 100% sure they can help people appropriately. Our CPR and First Aid Training Center was established in 2009 by a local firefighter and paramedic who both dealt with life-threatening emergencies of their own. Together they decided that they wanted to establish a company that provides education and training not only to medical personnel like themselves, but to any men, women or children who are interested in learning how to make a difference in the community. In the classes that we offer, you can learn anything from CPR, to assisting in medical emergencies such as heart attack, stroke & cardiac arrest.

Detecting Dehydration

Dehydration is a potentially serious condition experienced when someone loses more fluid than they take in. Young children and older people are the most likely to get dehydrated, so it is especially important for them to drink plenty of water.

The main causes of dehydration are:

  • Excessive sweating during physical activity or hot weather conditions
  • Sweating because of a high fever
  • Severe diarrhea and/or vomiting

If left untreated, dehydration can potentially lead to heat exhaustion and heat stroke.

Symptoms of Dehydration

The following are the key signs that may tell you someone is dehydrated:

  • Dry mouth or eyes
  • Dry, cracked lips
  • Headaches, dizziness, or confusion
  • Muscle cramping or tightness
  • A reduction in urination, and dark-colored urine

Treatment - What You Should Do

When you suspect someone is suffering from dehydration, adhere to the following first aid steps:

  • Sit the patient down in a cool place
  • Give them plenty of water or Oral Rehydration Solution to drink
  • If the patient is suffering from any painful cramps, help them stretch and massage the affected areas
  • Monitor how they are feeling and record vital signs (pulse, respiratory rate) if trained to do so
  • If they still feel unwell once they are rehydrated then encourage them to see a doctor ASAP

Contact Your Orange County, CA First Aid Experts Today

Here at OC Safety, we are committed to providing you with the best training at the best price, so we will gladly price match any other Authorized American Heart Association Training Site. If you are at all interested in learning how to assist in medical emergencies for members of your community, we strongly encourage you to reach out to us and sign up for a class. Our classes won’t take up much of your time, and will leave you feeling confident and proud of your decision to be of service to others. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to give us a call at (714) 960-1911 or fill out an online form on our contact page. We are excited to hear from you soon!

 

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It is common for new parents to be both very excited and nervous when welcoming a new baby into their lives. Many new parents feel afraid that they don’t know everything they should regarding taking care of their babies. If you are a new parent who is concerned that you lack the knowledge and skills you need to tend to all your baby’s needs, you’re certainly not alone as most first-time moms and dads can relate to how you feel. Just remember, that as time moves on you will acquire the knowledge and skills you need to provide your baby with the tender loving care he or she needs.

One skill that every new parent should have is the ability to effectively provide CPR or cardiopulmonary resuscitation as it is literally a life-saving skill. CPR can restore breathing and circulation until emergency personnel arrive. Below are some of the situations that can arise with your young child that could result in him or her needing CPR in order to survive until medical help arrives:

  • Accidents
  • Choking
  • Near-drowning
  • Poisoning
  • Head trauma
  • Smoke inhalation
  • Electrical shock
  • Severe asthma

Taking baby CPR training will give you the knowledge and skills you need to restore blood flow to the brain, heart and other vital organs. CPR also restores breathing until medical assistance arrives on the scene. When you’ve completed infant CPR training, you’re given the peace of mind knowing that you’ll know what to do to in order save your child’s life in case of a serious emergency.

Sign up for an Orange County Baby CPR Class

OC Safety provides infant first aid and infant CPR training in Orange County. You can call us directly at (714) 960-1911 or find a class to take that fits your schedule. Our classes are interesting and fun to take and will teach you all the skills you need to effectively provide CPR to your child or someone else’s child should an emergency situation arise.

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OC Safety strives to provide the best in CPR training for those located in or around Orange County, CA. While it goes without saying how important of a role CPR plays in our lives and the lives of our loved ones, what usually goes unsaid is that some of our loved ones are actually our furry little friends. Whether your animal of choice is a dog or a cat, we usually take their companionship and cuddliness for granted, but what happens when our poor furbabies find themselves struggling for air?

Pets dedicate their lives toward loving and helping us humans in any way they can. They express their love and share their cuteness with us through the endless amount of cuddling after we’ve had a hard day, listening to all our troubles, keeping us company while we’re lonely, or even posing for instagram-worthy photo and video. 

As their best friend, the least we can do is learn pet CPR and be prepared in case of emergency. While we don’t offer pet CPR training, we’re more than happy to give you the basics in case the unthinkable happens to our fluffy friend!

How to Perform CPR on Your Pet

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If your pet becomes unconscious, first and foremost – don’t panic! As traumatic and terrifying as this may be, you will need to stay calm during this process. Just like if a human would fall unconscious, you’re going to have to immediately perform CPR on the little guy. The procedure of performing CPR on your pet (let’s say dog) is as follows:

  • First, you need to lay your dog on his or her side on a flat surface.
  • Check to see if your dog is still breathing. You can do this by watching the movement of your dog’s chest or feeling for it with your hand. You can also check by placing your hand in front of your dog’s nose to feel for breath. A clear sign that your dog isn’t getting enough oxygen is if the gums are blue or gray.
  • If your dog isn’t breathing, you’ll first want to make sure that the airway is clear. Extend the head and neck, open your dog’s mouth, and look to see if there are any foreign objects inside. If there’s an object blocking the airway, grab the tongue and pull it outward. If this isn’t enough to get the object out, use your fingers or a tool such as pliers to grab it and pull it out. Please be careful not to push the object in farther.
  • If the object cannot be pulled out, you’ll have to try the Heimlich maneuver. To perform the Heimlich maneuver, you’ll put one hand on your dog’s back and the other on the belly, below the ribs. With your hand on the dog’s belly, give several sharp pushes inward and upward. Check for foreign objects in the dog’s mouth and remove them. After that, close the mouth and give a few small breaths through your dog’s nose. Repeat this process until you’re sure that the airway is cleared.
  • When the airway is cleared, lift your dog’s chin to make sure his or her neck and throat is as straight as possible.
  • Hold your dog’s mouth shut and gently breathe into the nose. By doing this, the chest should slightly expand.
  • Wait until the air has left your dog’s lungs before you breathe in again. You should take one breath about every four seconds. Continue this until your dog starts breathing on his or her own or the heartbeat stops. Keep monitoring your dog’s heartbeat during this process.
  • If your dog’s heart has stopped beating, you’ll want to start giving chest compressions. The size of the dog will determine the way you perform the compressions. For puppies, you should probably only use your thumb. For bigger dogs, you’ll use either use all your fingers or your palm. You should squeeze the chest to approximately half of its normal thickness or about one inch inward.
  • Compress the chest at a rate of about 80 to 100 times per minute. Make sure to alternate one breath for every five compressions.

It’s important to note that a dog’s heart will keep beating for several minutes after he or she stops breathing. If your dog’s heart stops beating at any point, you’ll need to immediately begin chest compressions in order to keep the blood pumping.

Similarities and Differences of Human and Pet CPR

Performing CPR on humans is very similar to performing it on pets because the concept is the same. You’re performing CPR in order to circulate blood and also breathing to attempt to oxygenate the system. However, there are still a couple of key differences. Some of these differences include:

  • With humans, you start with chest compressions right away before moving on to the airway and performing rescue breathing. With pets, you start by checking the airway.
  • There’s also a difference between the breathing rate. While you’ll be giving two rescue breaths after every 30 chest compressions on a human, you should give about one breath after every five compressions on a dog.
  • Obviously, dogs are small, soft, and innocent animals – they can’t take quite the punishment that a human can. Therefore, when performing chest compressions, you’re going to be more forceful when it’s a human rather than a little furbaby.

Having said that, CPR is mostly the same between humans and pets. Just remember this – with humans, you’ll want to follow the C-A-B method (compressions, airway, breathing). Pets follow the A-B-C method (airway, breathing, compressions).

Contact OC Safety Today!

If you would like to learn more about CPR, feel free to contact us with any of your questions or concerns. If you’re interested in registering for our classes, you can do so online or by giving us a call at (714) 960-1911. We look forward to seeing you and we sincerely hope you put this knowledge to good use; your dog will thank you for it! Woof!

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The team at OC Safety routinely provides companies of all sizes and types with on-site first aid training that is OSHA-compliant in and around Orange County and Santa Ana. If you're an employer who is considering providing your employees with on-site first aid training, you should be aware of OSHA's first aid training requirements so you can decide if you need to invest in this training or just instruct your workers to call 911 and wait for assistance to arrive. OC Safety offers on-site training for various industries including construction, aerospace, landscaping and agriculture. We also provide on-site training for the city of Santa Ana.

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Here are some of the OSHA's main requirements regarding companies providing first aid training. 

Medical Treatment Must Be Available for Your Employees 

Under OSHA's guidelines, employers must ensure that either medical treatment for all injured employees is in “near proximity” or that someone at the workplace is adequately trained to render first aid. Concerning what “near proximity” means, OSHA states that a workplace with a hazardous setting (factories, warehouses, etc.) must be within 3 to 4 minutes response time from medical services in case of serious hazards and injuries from:

  • Falls 
  • Suffocation
  • Electrocution 
  • Amputation 
  • Uncontrolled breathing 
  • Breathing cessation 
  • Cardiac arrest 

For employees in lower-hazard settings such as offices, OSHA states that up to a 15-minute response time could be acceptable.

First Aid Training Must Be Tailored to Your Work Site 

OSHA states that employers must ensure that the first aid training they provide employees is tailored to their work site. This means for example, if your employers work outdoors, they should receive first aid training that teaches them how to treat injuries arising from temperature extremes and how to respond heat exhaustion and heat stroke. 

What First Aid Training Must Include 

First aid training that is OSHA compliant must include teaching workers how to administer one-time treatment for minor injuries including lacerations, abrasions, bruises, first-degree burns, sprains and splinters. 

You Must Be Aware of State-Specific Requirements

In addition to Federal OSHA first aid requirements, employers must also be aware of state-specific requirements. For example, Under California OSHA regulations, a consulting physician must approve an employer’s first aid materials in writing. You can learn more detailed information about OSHA's standards and regulations by visiting the official OSHA website. 

Contact OC Safety

Whether you need more information about OSHA first aid training requirements for your business or wish to sign up for on-site first aid training for your workers, the team at OC Safety is here for you! We will gladly answer any questions you may have so don't hesitate to contact us.

We encourage all employers to provide first aid training to their workers to ensure that people with injuries are given the help they need while waiting for emergency responders to arrive. It's important to remember that just one minute can make the difference between life and death so it's always best to have someone on staff trained in first aid just in case.

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If the time has come for you or your group to recertify for ACLS, CPR, BLS or AED it's important to get the training you need from licensed and certified instructors. OC Safety offers re-certification courses to anyone who needs to renew their certificates in a very convenient and efficient manner. We are proud to offer American Heart Association-approved courses in BLS for Healthcare Providers, Heartsaver CPR, AED & First Aid and ACLS Advanced Cardiac Life Support for healthcare providers. 

The team at OC Safety understands that people needing to renew their ACLS, BLS and AED certifications are often pressed for time. When you choose OC Safety for the re-certification you need, we are confident that you will enjoy the time you spend renewing your skills. It's fast and easy to recertify through OC Safety to make renewing your skills very simple. 

Take Re-Certification from Certified Trainers With Hands-On Experience 

Our teachers are a team of friendly, certified instructors who have hands-on experience such as firefighters, paramedics and registered nurses who've personally used their skills to save lives. This helps make learning interesting and fun as you listen to real-life stories of how our instructors have helped people in all types of emergency situations. We make sure the students taking our re-certification courses feel confident while taking action in emergency situations to ensure they can provide the assistance needed until professional help arrives. 

Why It's Important to Recertify 

There is no grace period for re-certifying once an ACLS, BLS or AED provider card expires. Therefore, professionals requiring certification must be sure to sign up for the re-certification courses they need before their expiration date to ensure they're in compliance with regulatory requirements. This includes professionals such as: 

  • Doctors, nurses and paramedics 
  • EMTS 
  • Respiratory, physical & occupational therapists 
  • Aides or other healthcare personnel 
  • Medical or nursing students 
  • Anyone else requiring certification like personals trainers, camp counselors, day care workers, sports instructors, etc

Private individuals and groups who simply want to have the skills and knowledge needed to save lives should always renew their CPR, BLS or ACLS certifications. Doing so helps ensure that they can always respond effectively to first aid or cardiac emergencies. Because emergency situations can arise at any time or place, keeping your BLS, AED or ACLS certification updated is important, whether you're required to carry certification or if it's something you've chosen to do. 

Contact OC Safety Today 

If you would like to sign up for ACLS, BLS or AED rectification courses, please give the team at OC Safety CPR & First Aid Training a call at (714) 960-1911 or contact us online. We take pride in providing students with the best training experience with individualized attention when getting re-certified. 

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Hello 2016!

Goodbye 2015, and move over because 2016 is going to be a great year. Think of all the things you are looking forward to doing this year. Maybe a vacation, maybe you are expecting a child, maybe you graduate or begin school this year, maybe you plan to run your first marathon. Whatever the case, being prepared is extremely important, right? You wouldn’t get on a plane to a destination without having somewhere to stay, have a child without having its crib ready, walk the stage without your cap and gown or run your marathon without running shoes. (At least it’s not typically recommended). Why should being prepared in an emergency situation be any different?

At OC Safety CPR & First Aid Training, you will be trained by firefighters, paramedics, and RNs. Each have personally performed CPR and can teach the material hands on with a personal touch through their life experiences. We offer adult and pediatric scenarios in our training. Perfect for the whole family to learn.

Imagine running in that marathon and one of the runners drops down unconscious next to you. What if you were certified, prepared and able to save that person’s life?

That’s a pretty powerful thing.

Some of our students come to us for the first time and are interested in getting certified. Some of our students are returning to get recertified. The following are some examples of important cases where CPR certification would be extremely useful:

  • Babysitting
  • Daycare Employees
  • Adoption Agencies
  • Lifeguarding 
  • New Parents
  • Healthcare Professionals
  • Sports Instruction

If you are in any of these fields or simply are interested in getting certified in the case of an emergency, please see below how to become a student.

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Get CPR, First Aid, AED & BLS Certified In 3 Easy Steps:

  1. Sign Up Online For A Class That Fits Your Schedule
  2. Attend Class & Complete Training
  3. Leave Class With Your 2-Year Certification Card

Contact OC Safety CPR & First Aid

Thank you for visiting our blog and interest in OC Safety. We are located in Orange, CA and train anybody and everybody who travels to our location. Most of our students come from various cities in Orange County such as Irvine, Anaheim, Garden Grove, Santa Ana, Huntington Beach, Fullerton, and more. If you have any further questions, feel free to call (714) 960-1911 or send a message through our online form. We look forward to having you in class!

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OC Safety is dedicated to providing everyone who wants to improve their basic health care skills with exceptional CPR classes in Orange County. We have helped families, doctors, nurses, paramedics, businesses, and many other community members respond appropriately to situations requiring first aid. Providing great first aid begins with a kit full of the right supplies.

Your First Aid Kit Essentials

Building a basic first aid kit is simple. These are among the most important staples that a general kit should include:

  • Sterile gauze pads
  • Burn dressings
  • Antiseptic wipes
  • Antibiotic cream
  • Burn cream
  • Safety scissors
  • Tweezers (metal or reusable)
  • Fabric bandages
  • Aspirin tablets
  • Nitrile gloves

Keeping Your Kit Safe

Kits should be stored in a visible, accessible, safe location. Choose a place that is comfortable for adult family members to reach but cannot be disturbed by curious children. Some items must be removed and replaced when they get old, so make a habit of checking your kit to make sure that items have not expired.

Improve Your First Aid Skills Today

First aid, BLS, and ACLS certification or recertification from OC Safety teaches people of all backgrounds the proper way to respond to medical emergencies. Take a look at our class schedule and sign up for a course that interests you. Call us today at 714.960.1911.

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At OC Safety, we believe safety is important in every arena of life and work - whether it's working in a welding shop, performing maintenance 30 stories up, or even taking care of children. In fact, safety plays a vital role in the latter - and too many childcare providers don't have the proper certifications and trainings to be prepared for situations that could arise. For this blog, we're going to talk about the importance of First Aid & CPR training for childcare providers.

A Necessary Part of the Curriculum

Whether you're the neighborhood babysitter, an elementary school teacher, or a daycare supervisor, the importance of OSHA compliant safety training can't be stressed enough. Children require specific skills that go beyond the traditional techniques of CPR - and when the time comes, there's no room for guesswork. 

As a professional childcare provider, parents and guardians trust you with the lives of their children. They look to you to keep their child safe - both from minor paper cuts and in the case of an emergency. Children are naturally curious, and while this is a great trait for building their knowledge base, it can also put them in dangerous situations, which makes emergencies more likely.

Thankfully, gaining the skills and knowledge you need to save lives is easy. All of our First Aid, CPR, BLS, and ACLS classes are comprehensive and fully compliant to OSHA standards. All it takes is one day - and who knows how many lives you'll save.

Contact Your First Aid Training Specialists

Have more questions about our classes or proper safety practices? We're always happy to help. Feel free to reach out to us at our contact page with any questions you have. We can't wait to hear from you, and we look forward to seeing you back at this blog for more information and tips on making your life and workplace safer!

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At OC Safety, we want to make you safer in every arena of your life. Whether you work in a hazardous environment, act as a leader in your job or personal life, or you just want to do your part to be a prepared citizen, our OSHA-certified safety training courses are designed to give you the skills to save lives when the situation calls for it. While there are a variety of situations and occupations that call for safety training, few are more important than the role of being a new parent. Infant CPR is a nuanced technique, requiring thorough training and practice: it's much more than just 'two breaths and ten pulses!' For this blog, we're going to talk about why training in infant CPR is so vital for new parents. 

Safety Training for a Safer Child

If you're a new parent, we can imagine how excited you are. This is a magical time to cherish your new child, and we're sure you're ecstatic to start down the path of raising a child. But it's also an important time to ask yourself: are you prepared? If an accident were to happen, do you have the skills and knowledge to keep your child safe? 

The reality is that when it comes to infants, time is of the essence. The sooner life-saving CPR begins, the better off the baby will be in the long run. The proper skills could be the difference between life and death for an infant.

Thankfully, our OSHA-certified Heartsaver First Aid CPR and new Pediatric First Aid courses will teach you everything you need to do in case of an emergency. This one day course will teach your how to perform infant CPR, how to operate an Automated External Defibrillator (AED) on a child, and what to do if a child or infant is choking. You'll learn everything you need to know to be a responsible, safe new parent.

Contact Your Safety Course Professionals

Have more questions about infant safety or the classes we offer? We're always happy to speak with you. Feel free to reach out to us at our contact page or check out our calendar to find out when our next course will take place. Don't forget to check back to this blog for more safety tips and info, and we look forward to seeing you at our next class!

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b2ap3_thumbnail_perform-hands-only-cpr.jpgOC Safety is your number one source for CPR, first aid, and BLS classes in Orange County. The infographic above explains how to perform CPR using the hands only approach. 

If you see someone suddenly collapse, call out a specific bystander to call 9-1-1. (i.e. “You in the red jacket, call 9-1-1!) If there is no one around, call 9-1-1 and put your phone on speakerphone beside you so that you may take action simultaneously to save time.

Ask the person loudly if they are alright. If they do not respond, listen for breathing. Bypass checking for a pulse to save time. If you do not see or hear breathing, begin chest compressions.

Move the person to a hard flat surface. Find the mid point between the armpits, place the palm of your hand on the lower half of the sternum. Place your other hand on top and push down about 2 inches to the beat of the song, “Staying Alive.” (This is close to 100 compressions per minute). 

Continue compressions until another trained professional can take over, emergency responders arrive, or you are physically unable to continue.

Should I Get CPR Certified?

Short answer, yes. 

Why? You can save a life.

CPR is not performed enough. In the scenario above, if you are CPR certified, you will be equipped with more knowledge and abilities to help keep a person alive. Hands only is easy to learn, and mouth-to-mouth resuscitation is not required if you do not feel comfortable. 

If you are interested in CPR, first aid, AED, BLS training in the Orange County area, sign up for one of our classes that best fits your schedule. We need more people like you! If you have any questions, you may call us at (714) 960-1911 or message us! We’d be happy to help.

All OC Safety classes include a two year certification authorized by the American Heart Association which you will receive upon completion of the course. Invest in bettering yourself and boosting your confidence in emergency situations. 

Be a hero.

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OC SAFETY FIRST AID
1940 N. Tustin St, Suite #103
Orange, CA 92865

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